UCP Tracker: What they've done so far

What have the UCP been up to since forming government in April 2019? Since forming government, the UCP has relentlessly reminded Albertans they they will deliver on their platform, in which privatization of our public health is clearly underlined. This continues to be of great concern for those of us who believe that health care should be available to all, based on need and not ability to pay. 

Bookmark this page to stay up to date on critical changes and legislation affecting our public health care system.


 

The UCP appointed Janice MacKinnon to chair the Blue Ribbon Panel, and to look into our province’s expenditures. The panel was given a very narrow mandate to examine expenses but not revenues, and was tasked with recommending a path to a balanced budget by the year 2022-23, without raising taxes. The panel released its report on September 3, and the recommendations included massive cuts to public services, which will directly inform the UCP's upcoming budget.

In the area of health care, the panel recommended "transformational change in the way health care services are delivered and health care professionals are compensated." Most concerning was the recommendation that the government expand the role of private health care in Alberta.

Read more from the Parkland Institute

On July 9th, 2019, without media releases or formal statements, Health Minister Shandro announced on Twitter that the Affordable Supportive Living Initiative (ASLI) will continue under the UCP government. His announcement was made with a photo op at the Silverado Seniors Village, owned by Park Place Seniors Living. The ASLI program allows the government to provide up to 50% of funding for construction costs, followed by operational costs to run these facilities. Tax payers do not own the buildings, and once the contracts expire tax payers will need to buy the building back at the market price.

  • JUNE 28, 2019: BILL 9

Introduced Bill 9: Public Sector Wage Arbitration Deferral Act, enabling the government to delay wage arbitration for thousands of public sector employees, including many of the province's front-line health care workers. The government's decision to impose Bill 9 on all public sector workers not only violates their charter rights and breaks a legally binding contract with the employer it also undermines the importance of the vital work they do every day on behalf of all Albertans. 

Following Friends of Medicare's presentation to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills on Bill 203: An Act to Protect Public Health Care, the committee — comprised of 4 NDP and 7 UCP MLAs — voted to keep the bill out of full debate in the legislature. The bill would have protected our public health care system by prohibiting two-tier medicine, extra billing and any other form of private payment in relation to insured services, and would have banned queue jumping via cash payments. 

This was possible because of a new Standing Order implemented by the UCP government, which allows government MLAs sitting in a position of majority to determine what bills presented by the opposition will proceed forward. As we saw in the case of Bill 203, these 7 MLAs now have the power to decide on behalf of 4 million Albertans whether we have the right to hear our legislators discuss proposed legislation that would impact each and every one of us. In the case of Bill 203, committee members' unwillingness to allow it to proceed to the Assembly for a fulsome debate on the importance of strengthening public health care in this province brings clarity to the direction that we can expect this new government to take. 

The government failed to take action to ban conversion therapy in Alberta, including refusing to reinstate the Conversion Therapy Working Group, or to commit to supporting their recommendations. Health Minister Tyler Shandro’s office has said that they “don’t think there’s a need to address [conversion therapy] specifically because it’s not a valid health service,” despite the fact that over 250 complaints have been made to Alberta Health from Albertans who have been subjected to the practice.

Funding for proposed supervised consumption sites in Medicine Hat, Red Deer, and Calgary is suspended pending “socio-economic analysis” of the impact of the existing sites. The review has halted the development of the three proposed sites, and its results could impact the continued funding of existing sites across the province. Meanwhile, the government has not made clear what is in store when their “comprehensive approach” to substance addiction and misuse is eventually rolled out. What is clear is that Alberta is in the midst of an overdose crisis – a staggering 10,300 Canadians lost their lives between January 2016 and September 2018, with Alberta trailing only British Columbia in rate of overdose deaths. As of February of this year, the 3 existing supervised consumption sites in Edmonton alone have reported 420 overdose reversals and 15,335 referrals to other services and supports.

  • MAY 30, 2019: AHS REVIEW

As part of their election promises, the UCP said they would be commissioning a performance review of Alberta Health Services, with the intention of finding savings “on the administrative front,” despite the fact that AHS has the lowest administrative costs in Canada. On May 30 they began the review, with the final report on the $15.2 billion public health care agency due December 31. The real savings would be found if we looked at how much of our public health has been contracted out from under the public umbrella especially in home care and seniors’ care.

As one of their first moves as government, prior to even being sworn-in, the $590 million lab hub project was put on hold until the government has had the opportunity to “review the project.” Then-Premier elect Jason Kenney claimed that this project “will do nothing to improve patient services,” a claim which is both inaccurate, and patently disrespectful to laboratory workers and the vital work they do for Albertans. Reporting from the Edmonton Journal showed that our current lab system is outdated and overwrought, and without a plan in its stead, this halt to what was to be a major expansion for our public laboratory services puts Albertans’ health care in jeopardy.