The Parties' Promises

 

 

 
Alberta Party:

March 7:  Require children to have mandatory up-to-date immunizations in order to attend a publicly-funded school.

March 22:  Encourage cities to fluoridate municipal drinking water, and add coverage under the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan for annual dental checkups for children 12 and under, "so that every family can take their kids to the dentist during those crucial early years."

March 24:  Replace paper health cards with digital identification.

April 5:  Build 3,500 new long-term care beds through an investment of $230 million, and an annual operating cost of $260 million. Create a seniors' ministry separate from housing, streamline application processes for seniors' services, and create more culturally-specific supports for Indigenous seniors. 

April 8: Declare the opioid crisis public health emergency and increase funding for response by 50%, with a public health approach, rather than enforcement. Maintain funding to existing supervised consumption sites, provide community-based mental health supports for families affected by addiction, and expand access to naloxone kits.

>>  Read the Star Calgary - Alberta harm reduction groups grade political parties’ response to opioid crisis

>>  Read the CBC - Alberta's political parties need more aggressive approaches to opioid epidemic, expert says 

April 12:  Build and modernize hospitals including completing Edmonton South Hospital, Grande Prairie Regional Hospital, Calgary Cancer Centre and the Red Deer Hospital expansion. Build more non-acute care beds outside hospitals and improve home care options. Halt the NDP's plan to buy laundry machines for AHS, at a projected savings of $200 million. Review the NDP's plan for a medical superlab in Edmonton, with “the aim to cancel it.”

>>  Read FOM's lab privatization release

>>  Read FOM's laundry privatization release

>>  Read the Edmonton Journal - Elise Stolte: UCP plan to kill Edmonton superlab ignores dangers of the status quo

 

Alberta Liberal Party:

March 7:  Require that parents who choose not to vaccinate their children attend mandatory education to "review the science" behind vaccines, and to "sign a waiver recognizing those risks, and acknowledge that they will be required to withdraw their children temporarily from school if an outbreak occurs.”

March 26:  Support women’s reproductive rights by making abortion more accessible, particularly in rural areas. Provide free birth control for those who do not have access, because “access to birth control creates significant savings in healthcare, boosts the economy and improves health outcomes for women”. Improve “trans healthcare needs by funding medical procedures for transgender Albertans," ending gate-keeping, and funding hormone treatments.

March 31:  Invest $150 million for home care and assisted living, and $100 million to expand preventative care. Establish a preventative care task force, and identify and reduce administrative costs in AHS, "redirecting that to the front lines and to community and long-term care to bring down costs and to better spend our money.” Add 2,200 new long-term care beds through non-profit, faith-based and private operators. 

April 1:  Invest $50 million for community-based dental care. Pressure the federal government to fund universal dental care. Change fee rules to require dentists to publicly list prices and discuss prices with patients up front. Make the dental fee guide mandatory. Lift restrictions on dentists, allowing them to offer promotions. 

April 2:  Increase mental health and addictions treatment funding by 50%, including $150 million in immediate new spending and redirecting $450 million over 4 years. Declare the opioid crisis a "public health state of emergency," provide free suboxone and addictions counselling and expand number of supervised injection sites. Pressure the federal government to decriminalize possession of small amounts of drugs to reduce stigma, because “addicts are not criminals who should be jailed, they are sick people who need treatment.”

>>  Read the Star Calgary - Alberta harm reduction groups grade political parties’ response to opioid crisis

>>  Read the CBC - Alberta's political parties need more aggressive approaches to opioid epidemic, expert says 

 

Alberta New Democratic Party:

February 13:  Commit to making a “very major investment” at Red Deer hospital "to significantly redevelop and expand the hospital going forward."

March 21:  Invest $170 million to add 2,000 new long-term beds for seniors over the next five years.

>>  Read FOM & Public Interest Alberta's release

March 26:  Spend an additional $90 million per year on "strategic investments" to further reduce surgery wait times, create community-based care teams, improve emergency care, and expand access to specialists and mental health services.

>>  Read FOM's release

March 29:  Extend seniors' prescription drug coverage to remove co-payments for all low and middle income seniors, at an investment of $110 million per year.

>>  Read FOM's release

March 31:  Launch a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers to recoup costs from the opioid crisis. Start a pilot program for two storefront mental health clinics in Edmonton and Calgary.

>>  Read the Star Calgary - Alberta harm reduction groups grade political parties’ response to opioid crisis

>>  Read the CBC - Alberta's political parties need more aggressive approaches to opioid epidemic, expert says 

 

United Conservative Party:

February 20:  Kenney signs a health care guarantee committing to maintain a "health-care system that is universal and comprehensive, preventative rather than reactive, ethical and accountable, sustainable and cost-effective, accessible and portable, blends public, non-profit, and private sector provisions." Commit to maintain or increase health spending, “if we can find the money." Work to reduce “bureaucratic bloat in Alberta’s health-care system” by completing an audit of Alberta Health Services and exploring private delivery options to "find some savings to do things more efficiently without affecting front-line services.”

>>  Read FOM's release

>>  Read the Calgary Herald - UCP health care policy invites return to PC-era chaos

>>  Read Canadian Doctors for Medicare - Kenney's platform puts private profits over public interest

March 11:  Scrap plans for a medical super lab in Edmonton.

>>  Read FOM's release

>>  Read the Edmonton Journal - Braid: UCP plan to kill Edmonton superlab ignores dangers of the status quo

March 13:  Cancel a plan to upgrade Alberta Health Service's laundry facilities, and contract the work out instead.

>>  Read FOM's release

March 28:  Conduct extensive consultations and socioeconomic assessments of current and future safe consumption sites, and "see if there are better potential locations for existing sites that could provide the service without creating a serious crime problem.” Appoint an associate minister of health to focus on mental health and addictions, expand supports for opioid treatment and detox facilities, including a $10 million investment for a "virtual opioid dependency program." Invest $2.5 million annually for additional police resources, and $5 million annually to expand drug treatment courts. Contract out surgeries by replicating the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative to address wait times. Commit $100 million for additional mental health resources and improving access through primary care centres. Invest $20 million towards palliative care. Lift cap on midwifery services. 

>>  Read FOM's release

>>  Read the Parkland Institute - Fact-checking Jason Kenney’s wait-list strategy

>>  Read AlbertaPolitics.ca - The UCP Health Platform: Mostly spin, some two-tier medicine, and scraps of red meat for the base

>>  Read the Edmonton Journal - Keith Gerein: Despite calmer language, Kenney still behind the times on supervised drug consumption sites

>>  Read the Edmonton Journal - Keith Gerein: UCP health platform offers spending restraint, but also plenty of concerning questions

>>  Read the Star Calgary - Alberta harm reduction groups grade political parties’ response to opioid crisis

>>  Read the CBC - Alberta's political parties need more aggressive approaches to opioid epidemic, expert says